By Clark BoydThe World, WGBH BostonLaptops and smartphones allow easy access computing power, but researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology want to go one step further by turning the entire world into a computer.At this year's Computer-Human Interaction (CHI) conference in Boston, the Fluid Interfaces Group at MIT's Media Lab unveiled the latest prototype of SixthSense, a wearable, Read More »
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By Tim WeberBusiness editor, BBC News websiteJohn Chambers is a paranoid man. All smiling, all confident, but paranoid nonetheless."Healthily paranoid," he says several times during our conversation. Mr Chambers is the boss of Cisco Systems. His company has survived four economic downturns: in '93, '97, '01 and '03. Now he is pushing hard to make it through number five (and six, if like Read More »
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By Victoria GillScience reporter, BBC News"When I arrived here, I saw people with HIV being carried all day to get to the clinic," Paul Williams recalls."There were no testing services, no education, no treatment and certainly no monitoring of treatment. People just died." That was the situation in Bwindi, Uganda, three years ago. Dr Williams, formerly a GP in North-East Engla Read More »
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Easter eggs are not just made of chocolate. With a bit of perseverance they can be found hidden inside DVDs, games and even business software.Computer code with a hidden purpose can be found lurking beneath DVDs, video games, and software such as spreadsheets, or word processors, Marc Cieslak found out. The secret add-ons are often little jokes or tips-of-the-hat by programmers who have slaved fo Read More »
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By Dan Simmons Reporter, BBC ClickHave you ever dropped your mobile phone, sat on it or spilt coffee all over it Thought so.But handsets are getting tougher these days thanks to a series of tests they go through before hitting the shops.Nokia opened its test centre doors to TV cameras for the first time to show how devices are put through their paces. Engineers carry out more than 200 physical te Read More »
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The network is so pervasive it now invades our dreams and that is a good thing, says Bill Thompson"Last Saturday morning I woke up and reached for my phone so that I could spend five minutes catching up on e-mail, Facebook and of course overnight updates on Twitter before I got up to make some coffee and start the day. Radio 4 is the best way to find out what's happening in the rest of the w Read More »
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By Maggie ShielsTechnology Reporter, BBC News, Silicon ValleyThe founder of a new service that plans to stream on-demand video games over the internet says he feels like he has a big target on his back.No wonder, given that Stephen Perlman's vision to revolutionise the way games are distributed and played has been talked up as threatening the future of the console and of retail stores. OnLive, wh Read More »
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We need to take a cosmological view of the network revolution, says Bill Thompson."There is a famous and hilarious episode of Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads, the BBC sitcom from the 1970's, in which our eponymous Geordies, Bob and Terry, spend an anxious day trying to avoid hearing the result of a football match because they will be watching it later that night on Match of the Day. It Read More »
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